Thursday, 5 April 2018

Afghanistan needs educated nurses

Roger Watson, Editor

Afghanistan is often in the news but rarely for any news about nursing. But a recent article titled: 'We need higher education: Voice of nursing administration from Kabul, Afghanistan' and published in Nursing Open raises the profile of nursing in this country better known for its troubles.

The study, by Qarani et al. (2108) aimed to: 'explore the educational profile of nursing managers and head nurses at public hospitals in Kabul, Afghanistan.' Nearly 90 senior nurses from across Kabul were surveyed and, as explained by the authors: '(i)t was found that, none of the participant was prepared with higher education in nursing; rather they had only diploma in nursing; and 84.9% of them had completed their nursing diploma before 2002.; 11.6% of participants were currently studying; and all were in non-nursing disciplines. On the other hand 100% of the participants expressed intention for further studies mainly in leadership and management, computer skill, English language, in-service nursing trainings and higher education in nursing.' They concluded: 'This study suggests that there is a dire need to design both short and long-term strategies for the capacity development of nursing leaders at public hospitals in Kabul, Afghanistan.'

Reference

Qarani WM, Jan R, Saeed KMI, Khyman L (2018) We need higher education: Voice of nursing administration from Kabul, Afghanistan Nursing Open doi: 10.1002/nop2.140

The robots are coming

Roger Watson, Editor

The ageing population, increasing care needs and shortage of healthcare professionals pose major challenges in Western societies. Special service robots designed for care tasks have been introduced as one solution to these problems. The aim of this study from Finland was to answer the question: 'How prepared healthcare professionals are to take robots as their assistants in terms of experience and acceptance?'

An article based on the study has been published by Turja et al. (2018) in Nursing Open titled: 'Finnish healthcare professionals’ attitudes towards robots: Reflections on a population sample'. Nearly 1000 nurses and nearly 4000 other health professionals and the general population were surveyed. The general population had more experience of robots than the healthcare professionals and more positive attitudes. However, healthcare professionals saw a limited role for robots, for example, heavy lifting and logistics.

The authors concluded: 'The most constant finding between the respondent groups was that individuals who have experience with robots, have more positive attitudes towards them. Healthcare professionals have fairly optimistic expectations towards robot assistance, but only with certain kinds of tasks.'

Reference

Turja T, Van Aerschot L, Särkikoski T, Oskanen, A (2018) Finnish healthcare professionals’ attitudes towards robots: Reflections on a population sample Nursing Open doi: 10.1002/nop2.138

Saturday, 24 March 2018

The persistent problems of weight loss and nutrition for older people in nursing homes

Roger Watson, Editor

The problems of weight loss and poor nutrition for older people in nursing homes - especially those with dementia - persists and research into these phenomena continues as shown by two recent articles in Nursing Open, one from Slovakia by Harsányiová & Prokop, and the other from Sweden by Backlund et al. (2018). The Slovakian study is titled: 'Living condition, weight loss and cognitive decline among patients with dementia' and the Swedish study is titled: 'A registry study of nursing assessments, interventions and evaluations according to nutrition for persons living in municipal residential care homes'.

The aim of the Slovakian study was: 'to investigate cognitive performance and BMI of patients with dementia living in their own homes with family members, nursing homes and alone' and the aim of the Swedish study was: 'to explore planned nursing interventions and evaluations of such interventions, in older people at risk for malnutrition living in municipal residential care homes'. The Slovakian study showed: 'Cognitive decline was significantly faster for patients living in nursing homes and for solitary patients. BMI consistently decreased in the follow-up examination this drop was stronger in patients living alone and in nursing homes' and the Swedish study showed: 'A larger proportion of women were estimated as being at risk for malnutrition compared with men. The three most common prescribed nursing interventions were nutritional treatment, dietary support and weight control; however, interventions were not prescribed for all participants at risk for malnutrition.'

The Slovakian authors concluded: 'Nursing homes and loneliness would seem to be statistically significantly associated with stronger progress in cognitive performance in patients with dementia' and the Swedish authors concluded: 'although interventions in older people at risk for malnutrition are often planned, they are not likely to be evaluated. Not all persons at risk for malnutrition had planned interventions. The current study argues that there is room for quality improvement concerning registration of interventions and evaluating interventions in elderly persons at risk for malnutrition.'

References

Backlund A, Holmbeck O, Kumlien C, Axelsson M (2018) A registry study of nursing assessments, interventions and evaluations according to nutrition for persons living in municipal residential care homes Nursing Open doi: 10.1002/nop2.144

Harsányiová M, Prokop P (2018) Living condition, weight loss and cognitive decline among
patients with dementia Nursing Open doi: 10.1002/nop2.137

Tuesday, 6 March 2018

Does contraception lead to depression?

Roger Watson, Editor

The aim of this study was: 'to analyse the association of postpartum depression with drugs (including contraceptive devices and implants) with spontaneously reported adverse events reported in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System database'. The study was conducted in Japan and the article, which is published in Nursing Open is authored by Horibe et al. (2017). 

The total number of Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System System (FAERS) reports analysed was 6,157,897 of which 253 reported postpartum depression (PPD). The most common drug associated with PPD was levonorgestrel (IUD with progestogen) although nine other drugs were also associated with PPD. The effect of levonorgestrel was not age related. The three drugs most commonly relate to adverse effects (eg device expulsion, pain, hemorrhage) were levonogestrel, etonogestrel and drospirenon.

The authors conclude: 'Among the drugs in the FAERS database, the use of contraceptives or an IUD with progestogen might pose a risk for PPD. We showed the potential risk of contraceptives on PPD in a real-life setting. These data will enhance the information available to nurses and clinicians in advising patients on contraception and/or treating PPD and may be useful in the management of women’s health during the early postpartum period. Considering the causality restraints of the current analysis, further epidemiological studies are recommended.

Reference

Horibe M, Hane Y, Abe J, Matsui T, Kato Y, Ueda N, Sasaoke S, Matooka Y, Hatahari H, Hasagewa S, Kinosada Y, Hara H, Nakamura M (2017) Contraceptives as possible risk factors for postpartum depression: A retrospective study of the food and drug administration adverse event reporting system, 2004–2015  Nursing Open doi: 10.1002/nop2.121

Thursday, 15 February 2018

What do patients complain about?

Roger Watson, Editor

The aim of this study reported in this article from Sweden and published in Nursing Open was to: ´To explore patient-reported regarding communication and healthcare  and how these were responded to by healthcare professionals.´ The article by Skålén et al. is titled: ´Patient complaints about health care in a Swedish County: characteristics and satisfaction after handling´.

The study exmained the content of 587 patient-reported complaints in one County Council in Sweden. According to the authors the results show: ´that patients’ dissatisfaction with encounters and communication concerned all departments in the healthcare organization. Patients were most dissatisfied when they were not met in a professional manner. There were differences between genders, where women reported more complaints regarding their dissatisfaction with encounters and communication compared with men. Many of the answers on the patient-reported complaints lack a personal apology and some of the patients failed to receive an answer to their complaint.´ In conclusion, the authors say: ´patient-reported complaints regarding provided care stem from asymmetric communication, where the patients are not met in accordance with their individual needs. From a person-centred perspective, this can have a significant impact on patients’ satisfaction with healthcare encounters and experiences of quality of care.´

Reference
Skålén, C., Nordgren, L. and Annerbäck, E.-M. (2016), Patient complaints about health care in a Swedish County: characteristics and satisfaction after handling. Nurs Open, 3: 203–211. doi:10.1002/nop2.54

Monday, 15 January 2018

Living with chronic hepatitis B in Iran

Roger Watson, Editor

The aim of this study from Iran was to: 'explain the perception of patients with chronic hepatitis B regarding problems in the Iranian society.' Twenty-seven patients with chronic hepatitis B in Iran were interviewed and seven themes were identified: insufficient self-care, misperceptions, stigmatization, psychological consequences, failure, spiritual struggle and post-traumatic growth.

Money was an issue in being followed up as one of woman said: “My husband and I are infected with the disease in a way that I check my tests every 6 months and my husband every 3 months, but honestly, we do not refer frequently since the costs of the tests are extremely high. Actually, this is a great concern in our family, which prevents any further follow-up action.” Stigmatization and rejection were also issues, as one person said: “People’s view about the disease is so unpleasant. In offices, if colleagues know about the disease of an employee, they misbehave with the infected person.” Yet others took extreme measures to prevent spread as one woman explained: “I’m told that my disease could be transmitted through blood, but I take care of myself at home so that my children and husband could be safe from the disease. Even during cooking, I wear multi-layered gloves and never cook without gloves.”

The authors concluded: 'People suffering from hepatitis B live with their family and interact with people and the society. These people have different healthcare needs throughout various stages of life, such as in adolescence, married life, pregnancy, etc. Hence, it seems necessary to educate patients visiting Medicare centers using effective means throughout the life stages, as well as to provide nursing care without labeling. In turn, this will help patients adjust better to the chronic condition and will improve their quality of life.'

Reference

Ezbarami ZT, Hassani P, Tafreshi MZ, Majd HA (2017) A qualitative study on individual experiences of chronic B patients Nursing Open DOI: 10.1002/nop2.100